Top 22 Susanna Clarke Quotes

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“Alan Moore is a peculiarly unsung triumph of British culture, and Northampton, where he was born in 1953, the son of brewery worker Ernest and printer Sylvia, is where you must go to find him.”

― Susanna Clarke

“The phone conversations about a possible TV series of ‘Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell’ stretch back years, but now that the moment has come, now that I am actually here at Wentworth Woodhouse, I lose my bearings.”

― Susanna Clarke

“Nothing, I find, has prepared me for the sight of my own characters walking about. A playwright or screenwriter must expect it; a novelist doesn’t and naturally concludes that she has gone mad.”

― Susanna Clarke

“I first became an Alan Moore fan in Covent Garden on a Saturday afternoon in 1987, when I bought a copy of ‘Watchmen,’ his graphic novel about ageing superheroes and nuclear apocalypse.”

― Susanna Clarke

“I had always been fascinated by comics, but it had taken me several weeks to make up my mind to buy ‘Watchmen’; for someone on a publisher’s assistant’s salary, it was some quite unheard-of sum of money.”

― Susanna Clarke

“It’s not easy to convey to someone who doesn’t read comics just how Alan Moore has dominated the field since ‘Watchmen.’”

― Susanna Clarke

“I could always imagine more interesting places to be than where I was. And more interesting people than me being there. Eventually, this led to making up stories and writing things down.”

― Susanna Clarke

“I always really liked magicians. I’m not even sure why – except that they know things other people don’t, and they live in untidy rooms full of strange objects.”

― Susanna Clarke

“In ‘Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell,’ I wanted to create the most convincing story of magic and magicians that I could.”

― Susanna Clarke

“I can write most places. I particularly like writing on trains. Being between places is quite liberating, and looking out of the window, watching a procession of landscapes and random-ish objects, is very good for stories.”

― Susanna Clarke

“One way of grounding the magic is by putting in lots of stuff about street lamps, carriages, and how difficult it is to get good servants.”

― Susanna Clarke

“I had to restrain myself from buying a book on 19th-century fruit knives.”

― Susanna Clarke

“You can get this feeling of the English or Scottish or Irish or Welsh fairy, but it is by nature very elusive. It would be possible to pin down a German fairy, but the English one just vanishes, becomes the shadow under the trees.”

― Susanna Clarke

“I always start out saying exactly what everybody looks like. I don’t know why.”

― Susanna Clarke

“It’s funny, because I don’t think of myself as a novelist. I think of myself as a writer.”

― Susanna Clarke

“I tell stories. I kind of stumbled on that by trying to combine Jane Austen and magic.”

― Susanna Clarke

“I feel very much at home in the early nineteenth century and am not inclined to leave it.”

― Susanna Clarke

“It seemed to me that you make magic real by making it a little prosaic, a little difficult and disappointing – never quite as glamorous as the other characters imagine.”

― Susanna Clarke

“’Pride and Prejudice’ is often compared to ‘Cinderella,’ but Jane Austen’s real ‘Cinderella’ tale is ‘Mansfield Park.’”

― Susanna Clarke

“I must confess that in my teens and twenties, I loved ‘Mansfield Park’ rather in spite of Fanny than because of her. Like Fanny’s rich, sophisticated cousins, I didn’t really get her.”

― Susanna Clarke

“In some ways, ‘Mansfield Park’ is ‘Pride and Prejudice’ turned inside out.”

― Susanna Clarke

“She doesn’t do the things heroines are supposed to. Which is rather Jane Austen’s point – Fanny is her subversive heroine. She is gentle and self-doubting and utterly feminine; and given the right circumstances, she would defy an army.”

― Susanna Clarke
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