Top 28 Susanna Kearsley Quotes

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“As a former waitress myself, I know firsthand how a simple smile from someone can improve your day and how a single harsh word can destroy it. Being courteous and thoughtful costs you nothing and can sometimes pay you dividends in unexpected ways.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“Such is the endless dilemma of dialect. Not every reader will ever agree with the way that I handle it, no matter how hard I work to keep everything readable. But again it’s that balance I have to maintain between keeping it easy and keeping it real, and I know that I’ll never please everyone.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“In the years that I worked in museums, first as a summer student and eventually as a curator, one of the primary lessons I learned was this: History is shaped by the people who seek to preserve it. We, of the present, decide what to keep, what to put on display, what to put into storage, and what to discard.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“People didn’t just wear wedding dresses in the past. They also wore plain cotton shifts beneath them. As pretty as the dresses might be, and as lovely as they might look on display, if a museum doesn’t hang the shifts beside them or acknowledge that the shifts existed, that exhibit’s incomplete.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“It’s the pursuit of love and happiness that is the driving force of the romantic novel.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“I grew up in a very small town where nearly everyone knew each other, and odds were that whatever you said about a person would make it back to them by nightfall – something incomers learned, to their frequent embarrassment.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“I can have my day carefully planned, but if someone wakes up with a cough or a sniffle, then everything changes. Thinking quickly and adapting without grumbling are essential skills to learn, in my opinion.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“There was no DVR, no Netflix, and no binge-watching. We didn’t even have a VCR till I was nearly out of high school.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“The best way to show an emotion is not through a character’s words, but their smallest expressions – to take what an actor would visually do and try putting that down on the page for the reader to ‘see.’”

― Susanna Kearsley

“I have seen and really liked the varied movie adaptations of the book, but ‘Little Women’ has a sprawling, richly tangled story that needs time and space to weave its magic.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“I was born in the city of Brantford, Ontario, Canada – but by the time I’d left high school, I’d moved seven times with my family, my father’s engineering work taking us to places as far-flung as Bay City, Texas, and Wolnae-Ri in South Korea.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“Brantford was the fixed point of my universe, growing up. Both sets of grandparents lived there, with various cousins and uncles and aunts, and no matter how far we’d moved off, we came back there for regular visits. In a way no other houses have ever been, my grandparents’ houses were ‘home,’ and the sale of the last of those houses was hard.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“I spent five years of my childhood in Port Elgin and came back to spend another five years of my young adulthood there as well, including the years in which I was first published.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“My children are as at home in the Port Elgin library as I used to be, and they’ve sat in the cinema seats where I sat with their aunt every Saturday afternoon, watching the matinee movies.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“The recent controversy over the portrayal of Ken Taylor and his embassy staff in the movie ‘Argo’ brought home to me the great responsibility we writers have when telling stories that involve real people.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“Even a writer like me, who, in ‘The Firebird,’ is telling the story of people who’ve been dead for nearly three centuries, needs to take care. Those people may not be around any longer to tell me what actually happened, but neither are they able to defend themselves against unjust portrayals.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“I once walked through an exhibit in a large American museum that displayed First Nations artifacts in old dioramas, with mannequins that hadn’t been changed since the 19th century.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“A walk through the storage facility of the community museum where I worked might easily have convinced you that people in the past wore only wedding dresses, carried silver candlesticks, and played with porcelain dolls.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“Writing is sometimes a balancing act between keeping things easily readable and being accurate.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“Readers in general are not fond of dialect, and I don’t blame them. I’ve read books myself that I’ve had to put down because sounding out every speech gave me a headache.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“In my book ‘The Winter Sea,’ set north of Aberdeen, I couldn’t just ignore the fact some people there – especially the people in the past – would speak the Doric.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“One of the more interesting challenges I face when doing research for my novels is to trace the lives of women who are vital to the narrative and try my best to give them back their voices.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“If it hadn’t been for Bill Macdonald’s book ‘The True Intrepid,’ I might never have found out about the women who went down to work in secret in New York for our own spymaster Sir William Stephenson in the Second World War.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“When I’m dealing with the 18th century, as I do in ‘The Firebird,’ the difficulty isn’t only finding what a woman did, it’s finding her at all. Most of the sources I’m dealing with – letters and memoirs and written reports of the day – have been written by men.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“After the loss of my sister – my darkest time – I tried to think of the beauty she’d brought to this world and the lives she had touched and the love she had left behind.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“How much of our lives is consumed with meeting people, attracting people, keeping people and missing people? Usually, when everything is resolved romantically in one of my books, the characters stop talking in my head, and I stop telling the story.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“When you say that you write romantic fiction, there are a lot of people who have an image in their mind of the ‘bodice ripper.’ It’s the one term that most romantic fiction writers absolutely hate because it has no bearing on what people are writing.”

― Susanna Kearsley

“Romantic fiction, in the broader sense, can be any novel that has a love story somewhere in it. It can be a mystery or a historical novel, as long as it has this very strong romantic thread running through it.”

― Susanna Kearsley
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